Revelation 5:9 – Worthy Is The Lamb

Worthy is the Lamb: Glory to the Holy One Concert (Saint Andrew’s Chapel)

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Published on Aug 20, 2015
“Worthy is the Lamb” from Glory to the Holy One, performed live during a concert on February 18, 2015 at Saint Andrew’s Chapel in Sanford, FL. Learn more at http://GloryToTheHolyOne.com

Lyrics:

The veil of heaven opened wide
The scene was clearly set
John saw a scroll writ either side
Where seven seals were met
With booming voice the angel said
To now unseal the scroll
But none was found to meet the task
Not even one lone soul

Refrain

Worthy, worthy, worthy is the Lamb
Worthy, worthy is the Lamb who was slain

Convulsed with tears and broken heart
John’s hope was now assailed
“Weep not,” the elder counseled him,
“A Lion has prevailed!”
No lion came to take his claim
No beast of royal reign
Instead there stood a bloodied Lamb
Like one who had been slain

Refrain

Ten thousand times, ten thousand more
The host of heaven cried
All blessing, honor, glory, and pow’r
To Christ, the Lamb that died

Refrain

Christ the Lamb, who was slain

Blog Series:

Randall Van Meggelen, a church musician, comments on this hymn: http://www.ligonier.org/blog/for-chur…

Featuring lyrics drawn from Scripture and a lifetime of theological reflection, Glory to the Holy One is a collection of beautiful new hymns written by Dr. R.C. Sproul, wedded with soaring melodies written by award-winning composer, Jeff Lippencott. Recorded in esteemed venues around the world, this new project provides the church with an offering of that which is good, true, and beautiful in the Christian faith.

Revelation 5:9 Tyndale Bible

9 and they songe a newe songe saynge: thou art worthy to take ye boke and to ope ye seales therof: for thou waste kylled and haste redemed vs by thy bloud out of all kynreddes and tonges and people and nacions

Tyndale Bible

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The Tyndale Bible generally refers to the body of biblical translations by William Tyndale (c. 1494–1536). Tyndale’s Bible is credited with being the first English translation to work directly from Hebrew and Greek texts. Furthermore, it was the first English biblical translation that was mass-produced as a result of new advances in the art of printing. The term Tyndale’s Bible is not strictly correct, because Tyndale never published a complete Bible. Prior to his execution Tyndale had only finished translating the entire New Testament and roughly half of the Old Testament.[1] Of the latter, the Pentateuch, Jonah and a revised version of the book of Genesis were published during his lifetime. His other Old Testament works were first used in the creation of the Matthew Bible and also heavily influenced every major English translation of the Bible that followed.[2]

History[edit]

The chain of events that led to the creation of Tyndale’s New Testament possibly began in 1522, the year Tyndale acquired a copy of Martin Luther’s German New Testament. Inspired by Luther’s work, Tyndale began a translation into English using a Greek text “compiled by Erasmus from several manuscripts older and more authoritative than the Latin Vulgate” of Jerome (A.D. c.340-420), the only translation authorized by the Roman Catholic Church.[3][4]
Tyndale made his purpose known to the Bishop of London at the time, Cuthbert Tunstall, but was refused permission to produce this “heretical” text. Thwarted in England, Tyndale moved to the continent.[5] A partial edition was put into print in 1525 in Cologne. But before the work could be completed, Tyndale was betrayed to the authorities[6] and forced to flee to Worms, where the first complete edition of his New Testament was published in 1526.[7]
Two revised versions were later published in 1534 and 1536, both personally revised by Tyndale himself. After his death in 1536 Tyndale’s works were revised and reprinted numerous times[8] and are reflected in more modern versions of the Bible, including, perhaps most famously, the King James Bible.
Tyndale’s Pentateuch was published at Antwerp by Merten de Keyser in 1530.[9] His English version of the book of Jonah was published the following year. This was followed by his revised version of the book of Genesis in 1534. Tyndale translated additional Old Testament books including Joshua, Judges, first and second Samuel, first and second Kings and first and second Chronicles, but they were not published and have not survived in their original forms.[10] When Tyndale was martyred these works came to be in the possession of one of his associates John Rogers. These translations would be influential in the creation of the Matthew Bible which was published in 1537.[10]
Tyndale used a number of sources when carrying out his translations of both the New and Old Testaments. When translating the New Testament, he referred to the third edition (1522) of Erasmus’s Greek New Testament, often referred to as the Received Text. Tyndale also used Erasmus’ Latin New Testament, as well as Luther’s German version and the Vulgate.
Scholars believe that Tyndale stayed away from using Wycliffe’s Bible as a source because he didn’t want his English to reflect that which was used prior to the Renaissance.[11] The sources Tyndale used for his translation of the Pentateuch however are not known for sure. Scholars believe that Tyndale used either the Hebrew Pentateuch or the Polyglot Bible, and may have referred to the Septuagint. It is suspected that his other Old Testament works were translated directly from a copy of the Hebrew Bible. He also made abundant use of Greek and Hebrew grammars.[10]

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2 thoughts on “Revelation 5:9 – Worthy Is The Lamb

  1. Pingback: VIDEO Worthy Is The Lamb, Revelation 5:9 – StopAndPrayTV

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