1 John 3:2,3 – We Shall Be Like Him

Highland Hymn: Glory to the Holy One Concert (Saint Andrew’s Chapel)

Click onto any blue letter or number to see the video and text on the blog.

1 John 3:2,3 – We Shall Be Like Him

Published on Aug 20, 2015
“Highland Hymn” from Glory to the Holy One, performed live during a concert on February 18, 2015 at Saint Andrew’s Chapel in Sanford, FL. Learn more at http://GloryToTheHolyOne.com

Lyrics:

Above the mists of Highland hills
E’en far above the clear blue skies
The end of pain and earthly ills
When we shall see His eyes

Refrain

Lutes will sing
Pipers play
When we see Him face to face
On that day

His face now hidden from our sight
Concealed from ev’ry hidden gaze
In hearts made pure from sinful f light
Is the bliss that will amaze

Refrain

We know not yet what we will be
In heaven’s final blessed state
But know we now that we shall see
Our Lord at heaven’s gate

The beatific glory view
That now our souls still long to see
Will make us all at once anew
And like Him forever be

Refrain

Featuring lyrics drawn from Scripture and a lifetime of theological reflection, Glory to the Holy One is a collection of beautiful new hymns written by Dr. R.C. Sproul, wedded with soaring melodies written by award-winning composer, Jeff Lippencott. Recorded in esteemed venues around the world, this new project provides the church with an offering of that which is good, true, and beautiful in the Christian faith.

1 John 3:2-3 Wycliffe Bible (WYC)

https://www.biblegateway.com/versions/Wycliffe-Bible-WYC/

2 Most dear brethren, now we be the sons of God, and yet it appeared not, what we shall be. We know, that when he shall appear, we shall be like him, for we shall see him as he is.
3 And each man that hath this hope in him, maketh himself holy, as [and] he is holy.

ABOUT THE WYC

Version Information

Click to download the Introduction, Endnotes, and Conclusion, Introduction to the Apocrypha, and a Personal Statement Regarding the Apocrypha.

The “Early Version” of the “Wycliffe Bible”, hand-printed about 1382, has long been criticized by Bible historians as too literal, often unintelligible, cumbersome, at best a deeply flawed 1st attempt. In fact, much of the Gospels and the Apocalypse were transferred without significant change from the “Early Version” to the “Later Version”, and closely resemble the “Wycliffe-Purvey” text.

However, it is also true that when the “Early Version” is directly compared to the “Later Version”, the “Early Version” is, overall, a less satisfying read. It is not so finely tuned and contains many more italicized glosses which interrupt the flow. That is why hand-written variations of the “Later Version” became the foundation upon which the King James Version (KJV) was built. But, as was stated earlier, comparing all three versions side-by-side, it becomes clear that the KJV translators rejected numerous revisions made in the “Later Version”, and chose instead individual words and phraseology found in one variant or another of the “Early Version”. Why did they do this? Simply put, in countless passages of the “Early Version”, both the poetry of the language and fidelity to the original Greek text are superior to that found in the “Later Version”.

As the words contained within the square brackets in “Wycliffe-Purvey” readily demonstrate, the KJV translators repeatedly followed the “Early Version”, rather than the “Later Version”, in regard to prepositions (“the” in “EV” replaced by “a” in “LV”), verb forms (e.g., “saying” and “sitting” in “EV” replaced by “said” and “sat” in “LV”), and phrase order within a verse (“a/b/c” in “EV” rearranged into “b/a/c” in “LV”).

But of greatest consequence are almost one hundred significant words that appear in the “Early Version”, which were later copied in the KJV, but which are not found in the equivalent “Later Version” verses. Translation is an inexact science. A single word can often be rendered several ways (as the “Wycliffe” versions themselves amply demonstrate). Therefore these linguistic agreements between the “Early Version” and the KJV are meaningful. Examples include: “unction” (“anointing” in “LV”), “allegory” (“understanding” in “LV”), “mystery” (“private” in “LV”), “liberty” (“freedom” in “LV”), “captive” (“prisoner” in “LV”), “Caesar” (“emperor” in “LV”), “prize” (“reward” in “LV”), “wise men” (“astrologers” in “LV”), “veil” (“covering” in “LV”), “faith” (“unbelief” in “LV”), “concision” (“division” in “LV”), and “sand” (“gravel” in “LV”). These words, and many others, were first introduced into the English New Testament lexicon in the 1382 “Early Version” of the “Wycliffe Bible”. More than two hundred years later, they were utilized again by the KJV translators.

English Bible History: Timeline of how we got the English Bible

Click onto the following link to see a timeline of English Bible translations from the Wycliffe Bible to those of current date.

http://www.greatsite.com/timeline-english-bible-history/
English Bible History

The fascinating story of how we got the Bible in its present form actually starts thousands of years ago, as briefly outlined in our Timeline of Bible Translation History. As a background study, we recommend that you first review our discussion of the Pre-Reformation History of the Bible from 1,400 B.C. to 1,400 A.D., which covers the transmission of the scripture through the original languages of Hebrew and Greek, and the 1,000 years of the Dark & Middle Ages when the Word was trapped in only Latin. Our starting point in this discussion of Bible history, however, is the advent of the scripture in the English language with the “Morning Star of the Reformation”, John Wycliffe.

The first hand-written English language Bible manuscripts were produced in the 1380’s AD by John Wycliffe, an Oxford professor, scholar, and theologian. Wycliffe, (also spelled “Wycliff” & “Wyclif”), was well-known throughout Europe for his opposition to the teaching of the organized Church, which he believed to be contrary to the Bible. With the help of his followers, called the Lollards, and his assistant Purvey, and many other faithful scribes, Wycliffe produced dozens of English language manuscript copies of the scriptures. They were translated out of the Latin Vulgate, which was the only source text available to Wycliffe. The Pope was so infuriated by his teachings and his translation of the Bible into English, that 44 years after Wycliffe had died, he ordered the bones to be dug-up, crushed, and scattered in the river!

I. From Wycliffe to King James: the Period of Challenge

Click onto the following link for a more detailed study of John Wycliffe. It is important to know that Wycliffe “hand wrote”his translation.

https://bible.org/seriespage/1-wycliffe-king-james-period-challenge

Until John Wycliffe translated the New Testament, only small portions of the Bible had been translated into English. The English language traces its roots back to approximately AD 600; within a hundred years, the Psalms and a portion of the Gospels had been translated. In 735, the Venerable Bede, on his dying day, completed his translation of John’s Gospel. 165 years later, King Alfred the Great translated a portion of the Pentateuch. A few others during this period translated the Gospels or the Psalms, and little else.

Not only were these translations incomplete, but there were three other problems with them: (1) they were all translations from the Latin Vulgate, rather than from the original Greek and Hebrew texts; (2) they were not very good translations; and (3) for the most part, they were not accessible to lay folks, but were “translation ponies” to help the priests understand the Latin Vulgate better.
For over 300 years, no Bible translation into English was done, as far as we know. The Norman Invasion of 1066 was the fundamental reason: for the next three centuries English was only infrequently used for any written documents. Noblemen wrote in French—the language of the elite—and official church documents were in Latin. English was for peasants.

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