God’s Plan For The Ages – 27 -Eschatology Considerations

End Of Times Prophecies And Events Video

Eschatology is the study of the teachings of the Bible concerning the end times and the period of time dealing with the return of Christ, and includes such events as the Resurrection, the Rapture, the Tribulation, the Millennium, the Binding of Satan, the Three witnesses, the Final Judgment, Armageddon and The New Heavens and the New Earth. In one form or another, most of the books of the Bible deal with end-times subjects.

My study of the end times goes back to the year of 1976. There have been many people who have helped me to understand this exciting part of God’s Holy Word. There have also been many credible source documents that I have studied, “over and over.” The following individuals (some alive, and some deceased) are recognized as being highly knowledgeable in matters that relate to the end times. Their study materials have helped me to write this series of posts on “God’s Plan For The Ages.” Their names are presented below, but in no special order of importance.

Drs. C.I. Scofield, Merrill Unger, Charles C. Ryrie, Henry Morris, J. Dwight Pentecost, David Jeremiah, John MacArthur, Frank Charles Thompson, Grant R. Jeffrey, John F. Walvoord, J. Vernon McGee, Charles Swindoll, John Phillips, Ed Hindson, Tim LaHaye, Ron Rhodes, David Reagan, Jimmy DeYoung, Renald Showers, John Ankerberg, and others.

While we take personal pride in our personal study of God’s Word, there are things of scripture that may require other than reading the verses. There are very few people who are fluent in the original languages of Scripture. There is no such thing as a total word for word translation of any one language into all other languages. Word usage over hundreds of years will change. The first English translation of the Bible was that of John Wycliffe, who hand scribed the scriptures during the years of approximately 1380-1384 A.D. Check out the following link for a good explanation of the translations of the Bible.

http://www.greatsite.com/timeline-english-bible-history/

There are words that are present in the King James Version that would be seen as vulgar in today’s world, due to a change in common day speech. There are also translation groups that are not aligned with key biblical truths. In order to have a clear understanding of God’s Word, it is important to have words in scripture that are understandable, and that meet the test of Biblical accuracy. The translation committee of the New American Standard Bible has a history of meeting more frequently than others to make sure that its wording provides a clear understanding of God’s Word. In each translation, there is an explanation of the translation techniques of that Bible. However, there is no such explanation in the King James Bible. Whether a person believes that their translation attempts word for word, thought for thought, or paraphrase, to accomplish its objective of making God’s Word clearly and correctly printed, it is important to know how that Bible was translated, which should be found in the opening pages of a Bible. A key value of “thought for thought” translation is found in the truth that there is no absolute “word for word” translation from any one language to all other languages. An example was related to me by a representative of a major Bible distributor, as follows. There was a translation team that was working in a tribal area of the world. There was a question as to which word would best describe “a certain thing,” because there was no outside world word that described “that thing.” After a discussion on the word possibilities, the word “yam” was chosen, because the local people understood that “thought for thought” translation. There have been accusations that a certain translation “left out those words.” Such an idea comes from people who consider the King James Version to be the standard, which it is not. The King James Version is approximately the fifteenth translation, counting from the Wycliffe Translation, and is not the starting point. So, there are words or passages that are found in the King James Version that were not translated from the original scripture languages. For my personal use, I like the King James Bible. My early reading, memorization, teaching and preaching came through the King James Version, and I will always use the King James Version but, I know that there are problems with that translation. I also use the New King James Version, New American Standard Bible, Holman Christian Standard Bible, English Standard Version, New Living Translation and New International Version. All of those translations are sold in Lifeway Stores. Lifeway is very careful in any, and all, of the products that they sell. The translators of those named Bibles have no desire to attack the King James Bible, but to make the Word of God as clearly and as accurately understood as possible.

Credible research is required for anyone who writes articles that relate to Scripture. Because few people have a fluent understanding of the original scripture languages of the Bible, it is important to find those people who have demonstrated such language skills, as well as those who have shown a deep understanding of both testaments. As it relates to eschatology, it is important to also find authors who have proven that they have a good understanding of relating Old Testament prophecies to events of the end times. More than just a knowledge of words is important. An author of Scripture related-documents must not only know “about God;” they must also “know God,” in that they have an intimate relationship with God. Many hours of research precede all of my writings. In order for me to use the research of an author, such a person must also have many years of experience. Most of the people, whose works I use for research purposes, have had forty or more years of experience. If there is a question about any of the individuals that I have listed above, a web search will answer any questions of credibility.

A key passage of scripture that we should all understand is that of 2 Timothy 3:16-17. Consider the following translations.

2 Timothy 3:16-17 New American Standard Bible (NASB)

16 All Scripture is inspired by God and profitable for teaching, for reproof, for correction, for training in righteousness; 17 so that the man of God may be adequate, equipped for every good work.

2 Timothy 3:16-17 Holman Christian Standard Bible (HCSB)

16 All Scripture is inspired by God and is profitable for teaching, for rebuking, for correcting, for training in righteousness, 17 so that the man of God may be complete, equipped for every good work.

2 Timothy 3:16-17 New Living Translation (NLT)

16 All Scripture is inspired by God and is useful to teach us what is true and to make us realize what is wrong in our lives. It corrects us when we are wrong and teaches us to do what is right. 17 God uses it to prepare and equip his people to do every good work.

2 Timothy 3:16-17 English Standard Version (ESV)

16 All Scripture is breathed out by God and profitable for teaching, for reproof, for correction, and for training in righteousness, 17 that the man of God may be complete, equipped for every good work.

2 Timothy 3:16-17 New International Version (NIV)

16 All Scripture is God-breathed and is useful for teaching, rebuking, correcting and training in righteousness, 17 so that the servant of God may be thoroughly equipped for every good work.

2 Timothy 3:16-17 New King James Version (NKJV)

16 All Scripture is given by inspiration of God, and is profitable for doctrine, for reproof, for correction, for instruction in righteousness, 17 that the man of God may be complete, thoroughly equipped for every good work.

Notice the difference in the King James Version. There is a major difference in verse 17. We may be equipped, but we are not perfect.

2 Timothy 3:16-17 King James Version (KJV)

16 All scripture is given by inspiration of God, and is profitable for doctrine, for reproof, for correction, for instruction in righteousness:

17 That the man of God may be perfect, thoroughly furnished unto all good works.

Consider the following from Strong’s Concordance, Greek Lexicon: Equipped, 1822, exērtismenos

◄ 2 Timothy 3:17 ►

NASB Lexicon

NASB © Greek Transliteration Strong’s Definition Origin
so ἵνα ina 2443 in order that, that, so that a prim. conjunction denoting purpose, definition or result
that the man ἄνθρωπος anthrōpos 444 a man, human, mankind probably from anérand óps (eye, face)
of God θεοῦ theou 2316 God, a god of uncertain origin
may be adequate, ἄρτιος artios 739 fitted, complete from arti
equipped ἐξηρτισμένος exērtismenos 1822 to complete, to equip fully from ek and artizó (get ready, prepare)
for every πᾶν pan 3956 all, every a prim. word
good ἀγαθὸν agathon 18 good of uncertain origin
work. ἔργον ergon 2041 work from a prim. verb erdó (to do)

◄ 1822. exartizó ►

Strong’s Concordance
exartizó: to complete, to equip fully
Original Word: ἐξαρτίζω
Part of Speech: Verb
Transliteration: exartizó
Phonetic Spelling: (ex-ar-tid’-zo)
Short Definition: I completely furnish, equip, finish
Definition: (a) I fit up, completely furnish, equip, furnish, supply, (b) I accomplish, finish.

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This post is one of others that you can find in the blog under the category of “Journey.” There, you will be able to locate the Journey posts, which will appear in the order of their being published. If you click onto the following link you will be able to follow the blog and receive future posts automatically. Such an option is important for people who receive posts directly from me because, from time to time, email addresses are dropped from my list of contacts. Please follow this blog.

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